2021 Colonial Williamsburg Garden Symposium – Virtual

 I have a few things already on my calendar for this weekend, but this symposium has a flexible structure, releasing new talks each day to watch on your schedule. 
From the website:
In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, we invite you to join us from your home or garden, as we examine garden designs, gardening practices, and plant choices that embrace nature yet beautify the landscape. Guest speakers and Colonial Williamsburg horticultural staff will share some of their best practices for creating gardens that are sustainable and earth-friendly. While we may not be able to gather in a large group to enjoy this conference together, each conference registrant will receive a multi-day ticket voucher to redeem for a future visit to enjoy our historic and iconic gardens at a time most convenient to you!

After a year where many dove headlong into the art of gardening—many perhaps for the first time—now seems perfect to address the relationship between gardeners and the environments in which they practice their skills. Keynote Speaker, national gardening television host, Joe Lamp’l, will provide practical information to help us all become better, smarter gardeners. Professor and researcher, Doug Tallamy, will share how we are nature’s best hope for biodiversity, and David Mizejewski, spokesperson for the National Wildlife Federation, will share a whole new perspective on gardening.

 Award winning authors Anne Spafford and Nancy Lawson will discuss creating successful gardens for pollinators and other wildlife.  Our esteemed roster of speakers is rounded out by local garden experts and talented members of Colonial Williamsburg’s landscape and foodways staff, eager to share their horticultural knowledge and skills with you in presentations, demonstrations, and panel discussions. We hope you will join us virtually for the 74th Annual Garden Symposium, April 22-25, 2021 as we Celebrate Planet Earth by Giving Back with Our Gardens.

Register by April 1, 2021

Close Encounters with Nature: Native Design in the Residential Landscape

Few home landscapes can provide the stunning vistas of a Yosemite National Park, a vast midwestern prairie, or an ancient Appalachian mountain range. They can however, provide a far more intimate and interactive natural experience than visits to those landscapes ever could. In this session Larry will interweave a series of practical, ecologically-interactive landscape techniques, with the rich experiential rewards that applying those techniques can engender.

Virtual 32nd Annual Ecological Landscape Symposium

Note:  You can register for individual days of this four-day conference.

Guiding Theory into Reality:
It Don’t Mean a Thing if the Landscape Don’t Sing

The 2021 Ecological Landscape Design Symposium, going virtual this year, will explore how ecology, culture, and design can be incorporated into real-world contemporary practice. This program is geared toward landscape practitioners in the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions of the US.

January 21 & 22, 2021 | 1 – 4:30 PM EST*
January 28 & 29, 2021 | 9 AM – 12:30 PM EST*
*All four dates are distinct programs with different speakers – register for full bundle or individual days.

Incorporating science into landscape design is of little use if the resulting plantings are not harmonious to the people who engage with them, and are not in tune with the animals that depend on them. In this virtual symposium we will explore how scientific research can lead to tangible approaches for a new landscape tradition, one where ecological, anthropological, and sociological considerations expand the scope of landscape design.

Annual Symposium Brochure

REGISTER NOW

CEUs are available (ASLA-LACES, APLD, ISA, NOFA)

Cosponsored by:
New Directions in the American Landscape
Morris Arboretum of the University of PA
Connecticut College Arboretum

Fall 2020 Literary Series: Biweekly Webinars – Larry Lederman

Please note that for $40 you can purchase both the book and the webinar. The end time for this webinar is my approximation. – Connie

Garden Portraits: Experiences of Natural Beauty, a painterly collection of sixteen magnificent and diverse landscapes, is the sixth botanical photography book from Larry Lederman, the photographer of the New York Botanical Garden. The garden founders and stewards are a distinguished group. Included are philanthropist Lewis Cullman, jazz great Dave Brubeck, Arne Glimcher, founder of Pace Gallery, the late Anne Bass, and the late Edward Merrin, who was a preeminent dealer in classical antiquities.

The book’s foreword is written by Gregory Long, president emeritus of the New York Botanical Garden, who observes: “Lederman visits the gardens in all seasons, in all weather, at many times of day, in many light conditions. He wants to analyze their design and study their character. He wants to know their plants and see their environmental conditions and visual elements from many points of view. He walks the paths, forward and backward, and stops. Lederman’s garden portraits are visual tone poems inspired by places he has come to love.”

Join us for this webinar, the fifth in the Garden Conservancy’s Fall 2020 Literary Series of biweekly webinars, as Larry discusses his new book.

DATE AND TIME
Thursday, November 19, 2020
2 p.m. Eastern Standard Time

LOCATION

Live on Zoom

REGISTRATION
$40 Webinar and purchase of one copy of Garden Portraits: Experiences of Natural Beauty (Discounted price for the book is available only with registration to this webinar. Limit: one book per registration.) Please note, books will be shipped approximately one week ahead of the event for registrations that are made before Wednesday, November 11. For registrations made between November 12 and November 18, books will be shipped immediately following the event. We cannot guarantee that books will arrive prior to the event. Price includes shipping.

$ 5  Webinar only – Garden Conservancy members
$15 Webinar only – General admission

We will send a link to the recording of the event to all registrants a few days after the webinar. If you cannot attend the live event, but would like access to a recording, please also register for the event.

About the author
Larry Lederman’s previous books include The Rockefeller Family Gardens: An American Legacy (2017), which covers three gardens in New York and Maine; Interior Landmarks: Treasures of New York (2015), which features his photographs of architecture; and Magnificent Trees of the New York Botanical Garden (2012). Mr. Lederman’s extensive photography of the New York Botanical Garden was featured in New York Botanical Garden, which celebrates the 125th anniversary of the New York Botanical Garden (2016, Abrams Books).

Micro-Prairies / Meadow Gardening

ONLINE EVENT

Learn about low maintenance options that attract pollinators, save water, reduce maintenance, and most importantly are attractive!

Horticulture Agent Jordan Franklin teaches about Micro-prairie gardening.

 

FREE

Drew Jeffers

ajeffe3@Clemson.edu

864-596-2993

http://www.Clemson.edu/extension/Spartanburg

Endearing name, deer resistant flower

My favorite iris is in bloom – and does not require deer repellent.

I believe it is totally fine to choose a plant because its name resonates with you. I planted Blue Jacket hyacinths on the grave of my father-in-law, who was on the first ship hit at Pearl Harbor. I sent an assortment of daylilies with names like “Crimson Pirate” to my nephew, a then budding gardener. (My gifts are usually spot-on, but a box of roots did not thrill the young boy. His mother (my sister) did love them for years until something the guy truly did want – dogs – dug them up. Such is life.)

Numerous, huge, yellow blooms cover this deer resistant plant.

So when I decided to add to my iris collection Goodnight Moon was too sweet of a name to pass up. Now this plant has been divided a couple times, with one rhizome going to friend who raves about it every spring. Last year I moved a few rhizomes into a new bed by our deck and this spring it is reminding me why Goodnight Moon is my favorite iris. As I write this, she stands about three feet tall with at least five blooms. Although each bloom does not last long, they are so huge and numerous that this iris has been a show-stopper for quite some time. And, being an iris, no deer repellent has been needed.

That deer resistant foliage is a great addition to the garden even when the blooms have gone. I think that once you cut back the stem, the linear, upright leaves add an architectural accent to the planting bed. And in a few years you can divide the iris and add that accent throughout your garden.

I would call Lenten rose deer proof

It is risky to call any plant deer proof, but there are a few I would give that tag. One is Lenten Rose (Helleborus xhybridus or ), which seems like the perfect plant to me. It is evergreen, tolerates part to deep shade, resistant to deer and other pests, and blooms when few other plants bloom. Not just any flower either – sculptural, perfect blooms that entices me to pull out a sketchbook and concentrate on their beauty.

Lenten Rose is hardy from Zones 4-9 and is one of the longest blooming perennials in cultivation, with blooms that last for six weeks or more. To make it even more desirable, it is one of the earliest blooming perennials, with blooms starting as early as January in Georgia and lasting into April. Who couldn’t love a plant that blooms even before the daffodils?

Glossy, bold, leathery foliage is a year-round asset to the shade garden. Leaves are divided into seven to nine segments, falling away from the central stem like an umbrella. These coarse leaves are a great contrast with ferns and bleeding hearts. Although they are evergreen, the leaves can look a little ragged before the new growth emerges. This is just a little winter burn and aging foliage. Trimming off some of the older foliage in January or February not only makes the plants look better; it shows off the blooms better too.

The perfect spot for a Lenten Rose would be in deciduous shade, protected from the wind, in rich soil with plenty of moisture but good drainage. They would like the bank of a creek, along a woodland path. Lenten roses do better planted among hardwoods than pines, because they appreciate winter sun and pine needles accumulating around them can hinder growth. One thing Hellebores cannot take is soggy soil.

These plants are disease and pest resistant and prefer to be left alone. Once established, Lenten roses reseed to form a colony, creating a dramatic woodland groundcover that blooms in various colors. Seedlings can be dug up and moved, but established plants resent being moved or divided and may not bloom the following year.

My first few plants have reseeded to create a colony in my shade garden, with each plant producing slightly different blooms. The blooms come in many colors, including white, pale yellow, pink, maroon, purple and speckled. These are subtle, beautiful, nodding blooms on evergreen plants that are eighteen to twenty-four inches tall.

I love my colony of reseeded Lenten Roses but, oh my, what are available in nurseries now are stunning. The breeders have been working on Lenten Roses and now offer double blooms in bright colors with their faces rising upward, or pale pink fluffy blooms comparable to an English Rose, or blooms that look like they were hand painted in a porcelain factory. Just do a search on Pinterest to be amazed at the variety and beauty. These new Lenten Roses can be pricey – and worth every penny. Once in your garden, they will become your favorite plant, asking little and giving so much.

I suggest you shop for these plants locally, when they are in bloom. Then you know exactly what the bloom will look like and buy a plant that is already at blooming age.